Aquatic Weeds

People who have lakes or ponds on their property want them to be both beautiful and healthy. This means crystal clear water, a population of aquatic or semi-aquatic animals such as fish or frogs and aquatic plants that the owner has carefully added. These plants provide food and shelter for the animals and oxygenate the water. Unfortunately, it is too easy for plants that the owner does not want to invade their otherwise pristine pond, and compete with the wanted plants for nutrients. The situation is made more complicated if some of those plants are protected. A company such as The Lake Doctors that specializes in identifying aquatic plants can help a client know who is who in their pond and respond appropriately.

About Aquatic Weeds

Weeds, including aquatic ones, are simply plants that grow where they are not wanted. There are four categories of aquatic plants that most pond or lake owners consider to be weeds. They are:

Submersed

These plants are found completely beneath the water’s surface. They include curly leaf pondweed, cabomba, egeria and southern naiad.

Floating

The leaves of these plants float on the surface of the water. They can be free floating or have roots in the pond bottom. They include duckweed, watermeal, mosquito fern and water lettuce.

Emergent

The leaves and flowers of these plants rise above the water. They are also called wetland plants and can also grow in marshy or boggy soil. These plants include cattails, bog moss, water pennywort and alligator weed.

Algae

Algae are non-flowering plants. They can be microscopic, one celled plants or can make up forests of kelp whose fronds are 200 feet long. The type of algae that grow in lakes and ponds often appear in floating colonies and can be green, red or brown. Pond algae identification is important, for some types of algae are toxic to fish and other aquatic animals.

Conclusion

A pond or lake is its own ecosystem with plants and animals living in harmony. If this harmony is disrupted by unwanted aquatic plants, the owner can turn to an aquatic management service to restore it.

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