Homeschool Help: Multiple Intelligences

Have you heard of the theory of multiple intelligences by Howard Gardner? He states that there are a number of ways by which students learn and develop. Knowing these intelligences can help us teach our children more effectively. There are 8 dominant learning styles:

  1. Visual Spatial – they think in terms of space. They like jigsaw puzzles, draw, read maps and daydream. They can be taught through drawings, visuals and physical imager
  2. Bodily Kinesthetic – they use the body very effectively. They like movement, making things, touching, They learn best through role-playing and hands-on learning.
  3. Musical -they are sensitive to sound in the environment. They appreciate musical instruments, music and can learn by turning lessons into lyrics.
  4. Interpersonal – they often interact with others. They thrive in group activities and workshops. They need time and attention from the instructor.
  5. Intrapersonal – they have a deep understanding of their own goal and interests. They are usually in tune with their feelings, and have strong opinions. They thrive in self-study and they like journaling, books and creative materials.
  6. Linguistic – they use words effectively. They are auditory learners and enjoy word games, making up stories or poetry. They learn through read alouds and lectures.
  7. Logical-Mathematical – they excel in reasoning and calculating. They can think abstractly and see patterns easily. They love mystery games, investigations and logic games.
  8. Naturalistic – they learn best with an experience in the natural world. They love to be outside and learn as they get their hands dirty. They are naturally curious about their environment and surroundings and ask endless questions.

 

Division Worksheets

For busy moms like me, searching for division worksheets might be time consuming. Look no further, I am sharing with you this autumn division worksheet and answer key that is available from Education.com

Here are some different worksheet types to choose from:

  • Maze
  • Matching list of words with images
  • Word search
  • Crossword puzzle
  • Word scramble
  • Subtraction
  • Division

Watch your student’s division skills fall into place with this autumn-themed division worksheet. More fall and winter-themed division activities over at Education.com include engaging games, group activity ideas, and more.

Homeschool Help: Note Taking is Important

I believe that as a homeschooler, we should teach our children to take notes. As young as 2nd grade, we have been starting this habit at our house. When we are studying a lesson in Science, History or Social Studies, I require my children to write down important information on their notebooks. This allows them to remember what they are learning, process the information and practice their dictation and spelling skills as well.

When the children were in lower grade school levels, they  used the simple lined notebook which can be bought from the bookstores. They would write and list down information as they hear it. I would indicate to them what information would be important – like the what, when, where how and why of whatever we were learning. As the years go by, they eventually learned what information to record.

There are some children who are highly artistic like my daughter, and she has began to take notes using diagrams instead of words and sentences in her upper grade levels. Here are some samples of her work:


While my son continues to take down notes using words and sentences. Sometimes, we also use special pages. We have used Notebooking Pages before and it was helpful too. You can also check out Mind Mapping.

Whatever format your child wants to use, I believe that it is an important skill they need to learn as we homeschool them.

Homeschool Help: Assessment Ideas

Most of us have grown up in the conventional school where we take tests to measure how much we have learned. As homeschoolers, we also want to assess how much our children has learned and we need to give them exams and quizzes as we need to give them grades to be submitted to our Homeschool Provider (if you are enrolled in one).

But did you know that there are other ways to give grades aside from the usual fill in the blanks, true or false, identify and choosing the best answers? I’m sharing with you some of the ways to assess your child’s learning:

  1. Write a personal narrative
  2. Create infomercials
  3. Draw a comic strip which uses lessons learned
  4. Create a brochure
  5. Create a bookmark
  6. Make posters about characters from the book
  7. Calculate sale discounts from stores and online shops
  8. Find patterns
  9. Write as another individual (i.e. famous artists, scientists, historical person)
  10. Create trivia games
  11. Sketch what a scene would look like
  12. Invent a toy from a specific era or historical time period
  13. Recreate historical events
  14. Research family tree
  15. Memorize speech and poems
  16. Create surveys and analyze results
  17. Compose a poem or song
  18. Use game-based assessments like Physics Playground (http://empiricalgames.org/ppunity5/demo.html)
  19. Interview someone and write about it
  20. Make a digital presentation about lesson studied

To be able to give fair grades, you may use grading rubrics.

Homeschool Help: On Schedule and Lesson Planning

I have to admit. Lesson planning is not my strength. In the past 6 years that we have been homeschooling, I just go along with the book we have chosen for the school year and prepare the materials as needed everyday. I check the teacher’s guide and use that as a reference. Sometimes, we do a bit of unit study – so I research and download what we need and print them out. And we continue on and the cycle repeats itself. We just create projects to culminate the lessons we have learned and keep them as part of our portfolio for the school year.

This year, as my daughter is in 7th grade, I think I should be more intentional in planning for record keeping purposes.

Here are some tips on scheduling and lesson planning that I have learned over the years:

  1. Scheduling and lesson planning is different for each family. What works for me may not work for you. Some parents like to use digital planners while some prefer written planners. Some might want to schedule their day according to time  while others want a more relaxed schedule and schedule it according to subject.

    I have reviewed some digital homeschool planners you can use, and you can go ahead and browse through them. Personally though, I am a pen and paper planner so I would go for those that I can print and write on.

    I have shared our homeschool schedule when my daughter was just in 3rd grade and my son was in preschool, now that they are in higher grades, this schedule is a bit more full and may take a few hours more.

  2. I read some homeschool mom blogs that help me plan the year ahead of us and see if it will help me get more organized. Then I try to implement it and see if it fits our family’s homeschool.

    Here are some sites that were really helpful for us this school year:

    Donna Young – she shares  free printable planners and how to plan.

    Free Homeschool Deals – list of free homeschool planners, lists and forms.

    Donna Simpao – she shares how she plans the topics she will teach and how to do blending learning across subjects. She does unit studies.

    Kim Sorgius – she shares 10 steps for planning your homeschool year.

  3. The learning style of your children and your teaching style will be a factor in creating your schedule and lesson plans.

    My daughter is very visual and she likes words too so she enjoys reading a lot. I ask her to use blank-paged notebooks to write her notes on as she usually uses drawings to record her learnings. We usually look for chapter books or picture books that complements her lessons, especially in world history.

    My son is visual and auditory but I am not very auditory at all. I would need to do some more research this school year so that he can get to watch videos for his Science or Social Studies, and we can also use songs to enhance memory work in Bible.

    I realized that I could have done more than just breeze through our lessons for the past years, especially for my son. Hopefully, I will be able to implement these lessons that I have learned consistently in this school year.